Jigga what? Jigga who?: Points of (In)equivalence between Black history and rap music

One of the ways to look at how equivalence has been forced in rap music is through this idea of censorship. What this forces most of them to do is to come up with phrases or other words that equate the word that has to be removed for its “vulgarity”/ “violence.” In this process, equivalence begins to resonate Continue reading “Jigga what? Jigga who?: Points of (In)equivalence between Black history and rap music”

Your Perk of Misogyny is still Misogynistic

Recently, my friend interviewed my other friend for an interview with a fashion company I had interned with. In the interview she was mostly asked questions pertaining to her opinions and experiences on existing as a woman in Nigeria (more specifically Lagos). In the course of the interview, she was asked about the most exciting part of being a young woman in Lagos: The question: What has … Continue reading Your Perk of Misogyny is still Misogynistic

What’s so funny?: Laughter as Violence

Originally posted on Spike Lee's Joints 2:
If violence is defined is defined by the intent to hurt/damage… what do we call it when the perpetrator of a violent act does not intend to hurt but still does? Which subject controls the axes on which the word is defined- the victim or the perpetrator? In Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied, there is a moment where he sits in one… Continue reading What’s so funny?: Laughter as Violence

Erasing me: Rethinking violence without aggression

Originally posted on Spike Lee's Joints 2:
? “The axe soon forgets, but the tree always remembers”- Someone In Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied, there is a moment where he sits in one place, surrounded by a blackness blacker than himself; a reminder of what the color black actually looks like and how uncertain and scared it makes me feel. But it is not Riggs’ affective commentary on… Continue reading Erasing me: Rethinking violence without aggression

A Black woman has a Black body too: Remembering Black women in Revolutionary Roles

Originally posted on Spike Lee's Joints 2:
I understand the need to mythicize Malcolm X as a man for the struggle, but where does that leave the women of the struggle? Change which is very tied to what affects everyone, is usually also tied to the way way its disruption is most visible. Change is a loaded term and revolution is an even more loaded term that… Continue reading A Black woman has a Black body too: Remembering Black women in Revolutionary Roles