This is a vent, about the way we pinch ourselves to death

  It hurts to see all the ways that Nigerian culture hurts and does not heal. People are saying leaders should change but civilians too, change. Me too, i should change. Vulcanizers too, change. Beggars too, change. Police officer too, change. musicians too, change. Change your songs- stop singing songs about gold chains, nyash, alcohol and money for a while and see what else you … Continue reading This is a vent, about the way we pinch ourselves to death

Right or Righteous: Looking at conscience as a panoptic apparatus

The lens- as a panoptic gaze- is literally above the humans in Spike Lee’s Do The Right Thing, but its powers are also unlike that of the humans in the movie. For instance, the ability of the gaze to seamlessly, and silently move in and out of rooms- without having to knock on doors, or open doors, or creak on floorboards- has a deep metaphorical significance for the way the panoptic view does not operate through the physical body of a single individual , but through a complex structure that transcends what one individual is humanly capable of doing. Continue reading “Right or Righteous: Looking at conscience as a panoptic apparatus”

What’s so funny?: Laughter as Violence

Originally posted on Spike Lee's Joints 2:
If violence is defined is defined by the intent to hurt/damage… what do we call it when the perpetrator of a violent act does not intend to hurt but still does? Which subject controls the axes on which the word is defined- the victim or the perpetrator? In Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied, there is a moment where he sits in one… Continue reading What’s so funny?: Laughter as Violence

Erasing me: Rethinking violence without aggression

Originally posted on Spike Lee's Joints 2:
? “The axe soon forgets, but the tree always remembers”- Someone In Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied, there is a moment where he sits in one place, surrounded by a blackness blacker than himself; a reminder of what the color black actually looks like and how uncertain and scared it makes me feel. But it is not Riggs’ affective commentary on… Continue reading Erasing me: Rethinking violence without aggression

A Black woman has a Black body too: Remembering Black women in Revolutionary Roles

Originally posted on Spike Lee's Joints 2:
I understand the need to mythicize Malcolm X as a man for the struggle, but where does that leave the women of the struggle? Change which is very tied to what affects everyone, is usually also tied to the way way its disruption is most visible. Change is a loaded term and revolution is an even more loaded term that… Continue reading A Black woman has a Black body too: Remembering Black women in Revolutionary Roles